BACN Awards

Career Awards

Matt Lambon Ralph accepting the mid-career research award at the 2017 conference in Plymouth from BACN president Stephen Jackson.

Matt Lambon Ralph accepting the mid-career research award at the 2017 conference in Plymouth from BACN president Stephen Jackson.

Early and mid level career awards

Each year, BACN has the pleasure to award an early and mid level career award to researchers who have contributed their high-standard and pioneering work to the field of cognitive neuroscience. Past recipients of the award include Matt Lambon Ralph (University of Manchester; 2017 mid-career award), Duncan Astle (MRC CBU, Cambridge; 2017 early-career award), Masud Husain (University of Oxford; 2016 mid-career award) and Parashkev Nachev (UCL; 2016 early-career award). We are keen to hear from you regarding nominations. If you have a candidate in mind whose research and scientific approach have inspired you, please get in touch with our secretary Nick Cooper (ncooper@essex.ac.uk).

 

 

nomination criteria

Members of the society may nominate prize-winners in two categories (Early Career, Mid Career), via an annual competition with a closing date of the last day of September in the year prior to the award being made.  Both awards aim to reward and to recognise distinguished scholarship and research excellence undertaken over a period by a cognitive neuroscientist who is currently active in research, and who has made a substantial contribution to Cognitive Neuroscience in the UK. 

We anticipate that those nominated for the 'BACN Early Career Award' will typically have between 1-10 years post-PhD research experience, while those nominated for the 'BACN Mid Career Award' will typically have between 10-25 years post-PhD research experience. Special circumstances such as career breaks will be taken into account when considering nominees.  The short-list for each award must contain at least one female candidate. Nominations should be sent to the Secretary and will be decided on by the Committee. Nominations should include a recent CV for the nominee together with a covering letter outlining their contribution to cognitive neuroscience research and theory.  Self-nominations are accepted if accompanied by a supporting statement from a senior colleague.  Award winners are expected to give a presentation at the meeting in which the prize is conferred, and they need not be members of the society.